MS Locke c.33, fols 27-28

 

Contents of this manuscript description

Introduction

Size

Watermarks

Stitching and pins

Quires and page numbers

Contents

Marginal entries

Scribes/Ink

Texts within this manuscript

20. Ignorantia (1690) fols 27-28 [about]

 

Introduction

[1] Guardbook containing sheets (bound together at a later stage), used for notes on Locke’s reading, arranged according to his method for commonplacing. Folios 27-28 are the two leaves of a quire formed by folding a sheet.

Size

[2] Size, not of the leaves but of the complete sheet, 407 × 329 mm.

Watermarks

[3] Fol. 27 has a watermark consisting of a lion, probably that of the Seven Provinces, holding seven arrows and a sword in a coat of arms containing five fleurs-de-lis (see Heawood 3141 or 3144). Fol. 28 has a barely legible countermark, probably two letters, the first letter possibly a ‘D’.

Stitching and pins

[4] No stitching. The middle of the outer edge has a hole, which can also be found in fols 8-14 and 17-44 (the edges of fols 15-16 are frayed but may have had a similar hole). Along the horizontal edges of the folios are rows of tiny punctures that allowed Locke to draw the vertical lines that demarcated the columns needed for his method of common-placing.

Quires and page numbers

[5] The letter of the quire containing fols 27-28 is ‘C’ (in lower left margin of fol. 27r).

Contents

[6] ‘Ignorantia’.

Marginal entries

[7] Folios 27r, 28r and 28v have ‘Adversaria Oct. 88’ in the upper left corner. In addition, the marginal entry 90 can be found at some point on each of the four pages of fols 27-28, and appears at the very top of fol. 27v, i.e. the page of ‘Ignorantia’.

Scribes/Ink

[8] Locke’s hand.

Milton, ‘Manservant as Amanuensis: Sylvester Brounower’, p. 81.
The place that Locke prescribes here is indeed the place that it has been given both in C-1706 and in the present edition; this place results once his instructions in MS Locke e.1 pp. 113-114 concerning the introductory paragraphs on pp. 114-116 of the same manuscript are carried out (see below, 1. Of the Conduct of the Understanding (1697-1704) [23]).
In the present edition, this sentence is given in the collation of MS Locke e.1 with MS Locke c.28.’
Cf. Heawood, 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.