MS Locke c.28, fols 117-118

 

Contents of this manuscript description

Introduction

Size

Watermarks

Stitching and pins

Quires and page numbers

Contents

Marginal entries

Catchwords

Scribes/Ink

Texts within this manuscript

29. ‘By this learned art’ (c. 1694-c. 1695) fols 117r-118r [about]

30. ‘We cannot but thinke that angels’ (c. 1694-1695) fols 118r-118v [about]

 

Introduction

[1] Ff. 2. Paper. Two sheets, each sheet a wrapper to an old letter. Fol. 117: ‘For Sr Francis Masham a member of Parliament at Oates. To be left with Mr Iosline a shopkeeper In Bishop Stratford’. Fol. 118: ‘These; / For John Lock Esqr. at Oates To bee Left with Mr. Ioselin a shopkeeper in, Bishop-Startford: / Edw: Clarke: Essex:’ Locke folded the letters vertically, and filled the left-hand side of the back of fol 117 and both sides of fol 118 with his own entries, using the right-hand side for corrections and additions.

Size

[2] Fol. 117: 188 × 233 mm; fol. 118: 214 × 344 mm.

Watermarks

[3] Fol. 117: no watermark; countermark: ‘HD’. Fol. 118: no watermark; probably a countermark containing an ‘S’ as first letter.

Stitching and pins

[4] Fol. 117: some punctures along the edge, perhaps signs of earlier binding. Fol. 118: none.

Quires and page numbers

[5] None, folio numbers added by the librarian of the Bodleian Library.

Contents

[6] (1) ‘By this learned art’. Draft for projected addition to the Essay, III.x.11 (MS Locke c.28, fols 117r-118r); the text is preceded by ‘B. 3. c. 10 § 11 - Organs of Speech’ on fol. 117r, indicating the point of insertion in the Essay. (2) ‘We cannot but think that angels’. Draft for projected addition to the Essay, III.x.13 (MS Locke c.28, fols 118r-118v); the text is preceded by ‘B. III c. x § 13 - to doe soe.’, again indicating the point of insertion in the Essay. The endorsement Understanding (perhaps followed by a letter that has become illegible because of damage to the manuscript) probably applies to both fragments, and hence is given at the end of both fragments. Neither fragment was eventually included.

Marginal entries

[7] Fragment ‘By this learned art’ is marked by a header at the top of the right-hand side of fol. 117r and fol. 118r: ‘Understanding § 11’ and by ‘<Addi>tions B. 3. C. 10. § 11’ on fol. 118v. There is no marginal header for fragment ‘We cannot but thinke.

Catchwords

[8] Folios 117r and 118r are connected by the catchwords ‘argue against’ at the bottom of fol. 117r.

Scribes/Ink

[9] The texts are written in Locke’s hand. The address on fol. 117 is in the hand of Robert Pawling, who habitually addressed his letters to Locke to Sir Francis Masham. The address on fol. 118 is by Edward Clarke.

Milton, ‘Manservant as Amanuensis: Sylvester Brounower’, p. 81.
The place that Locke prescribes here is indeed the place that it has been given both in C-1706 and in the present edition; this place results once his instructions in MS Locke e.1 pp. 113-114 concerning the introductory paragraphs on pp. 114-116 of the same manuscript are carried out (see below, 1. Of the Conduct of the Understanding (1697-1704) [23]).
In the present edition, this sentence is given in the collation of MS Locke e.1 with MS Locke c.28.’
Cf. Heawood, 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.