MS Locke c.28, fols 143-154

 

Contents of this manuscript description

Introduction

Size

Watermarks

Stitching and pins

Quires and page numbers

Contents

Marginal entries

Catchwords

Scribes/Ink

Miscellanea (MS)

Texts within this manuscript

7. Thus I thinke (1692?) fols 143-144, 153-154 [about]

Of Ethick in General, MS Locke c.28, fols 145-152 [DO NOT INCLUDE] fols 145-152 [about]

 

Introduction

[1] Ff. 12. Paper. Quire consisting of 6 quarter sheets, each sheet folded once, resulting in 12 leaves.

Size

[2] See [4].

Watermarks

[3] See Table 8.

Stitching and pins

[4] All folios have signs of punctures, used for drawing pencil lines; all punctures can be found on these lines. The punctures fall into two distinct patterns. Pattern A: fols 143-144 and 153-154 have a puncture through each of the four points where the marginal pencil lines cross (but no such lines on the empty fols 153r, 153v and 154r). In addition, these fols have 1 extra puncture, located 4 mm above the inner lower puncture. Pattern B: fols 145-152 have a single vertical marginal pencil line, with punctures at the top and bottom of this line. These punctures are in general more difficult to perceive than the punctures of pattern A. In table 9 the editors give the size of each folio, its puncture pattern, and finally the distance between the top puncture and the (lowest) bottom puncture on the inner margin line. Sizes are given in mm and are not of the quarter sheets but of the individual folios. The width of the folios has to remain approximative, since part of their inner vertical edge cannot be measured, due to pasting by the Bodleian librarian.

Quires and page numbers

[5] Formula: see [10]. A precise appreciation of the relation between quires and folios is complicated by the way in which the folios have been pasted together by the Bodleian librarian. The manuscript consists of six quarter sheets, each quarter sheet devided into two leaves by one fold, resulting in 12 leaves=24 pages. Fol. numbers added by the Bodleian librarian. Folios 143-144 have page numbers 1-4, in the upper outer corner of each page. These numbers will be used in the transcription of the present edition. Deleted (quire) numbers in Locke’s hand, preceded by an encircled dot, at the bottom of fol. 147r: ‘1’; fol. 149r: ‘2’; fol. 151r: ‘3’. Letters/numbers at the bottom of fol. 146r: ‘a’; fol. 147r: [.] b fol. 149r: ‘c’; fol. 151r: ‘d’; fol. 152r: ‘e’ (dot between square brackets is an illegible deletion). Finally, fol. 154v has the number ‘58’ at the bottom of the page. ‘Thus I thinke’ consist of one quire = 2 quarter sheets = 4 leaves = 8 pages, fols 143-144 and fols 153-154, wrapped around ‘Of Ethick in General’ on fols 145-152, this last text consisting of 4 quires, each quire 1 quarter sheet, each quarter sheet two leaves. This quiring pattern is corroborated by the table in ‘Stichings and pins’ (see [4]) and not contradicted by the table giving the watermarks (see [3]). Prof. Sandy Stewart very perceptively pointed out that the numbers 1-2-3 on fols 147r, 149r and 151r may have been the numbers of the original series, which would mean that the deleted text at the start of fol. 147r originally formed the start of ‘Of Ethick’. Folios 145-146 may originally have been wrapped around this text, with (what is now) fol. 146r as the first page and 145v as the last page, and the number ‘58’ indicating the number of sheets contained by fols 145-146. At a later stage Locke may have used fols 145-156 to draft a new start for ‘Of Ethick’, starting on fol. 146r, and continuing with the already existing text on fol. 147r. This may have prompted Locke to discard the old 1-2-3 numbering and to introduce the new a-b-c-d-e numbering. The consequences of this revision for the date of ‘Of Ethick’ will be discussed in the textual comments on ‘Of Ethick’ in vol. II of the Drafts for the Essay of the Clarendon Locke Edition. The use of ‘un’ in the margin of fol. 146 (= ‘Understanding’) may point to a post-1690 date of at least this addition, while the use of ‘Intell’ (=‘Intellectus’, deleted and replaced by ‘un’) for the other quires, may point to a pre-1690 date. However, the reference to the old pre-1690 chapter series of the Essay, not only on 147r, 149r, and 151r, but also on the 146r (see [7]), suggests a pre-1690 date for the entire text, including the text entered on fol. 146, although it is possible that the old chapter numbers on 146r were entered before 1690, while the addition was entered after 1690.

Contents

[6] Contents: ‘Thus I thinke’, fols 143-144 and fols 153-154 and ‘Of Ethick in General’ (not included in this volume), fols 146-152; the last part of sect. 10 and the first part of sect. 11 repeat a passage in sect. 160 of Draft B for the Essay. Folios 145r, 145v, 152v, 153r, 153v and 154r are empty.

Marginal entries

[7] Folios 143-144/153-154: no marginal entries; the (additional) title ‘Ethica’ is entered on fol. 154v. Folios 145-152: the following complete or partial titles can be found in the margin of fol. 146r (deletions between square brackets, illegible letters indicated by dots): ‘Ethica’ and ‘Un’; fols 147r, 149r, 151r: ‘[Intell] Un’; fol. 152r: ‘Un’. In addition, references to the Essay appear at the top of fol. 146r: ‘l. 4. c [2[.]4] [21] 2[2]1; fol. 147r: l. 4. c. [2[.]4] [21]2[2] 1; fol. 149r: l. 4. c. [2[.]4] [21] 2[2]1; fol. 151r: l. 4. c. [2[.]4] [21] 2[2]1.

Catchwords

[8] ‘Thus I thinke’ has no catchwords, but ‘Of Ethick in General’ has.

Scribes/Ink

[9] Scribe of ‘Thus I thinke’, fols 143-144/153-154: Locke. Scribes of ‘Of Ethick in General, fols 145-152: Locke and a scribe (possibly Sylvester Brounower), whose hand appears in the passage copied from Draft B (see [6]); this hand continues for almost a complete page after the fragment taken from Draft B. Ink of fols 143-144 and 153-154 seems predominantly black, while the ink on fols 145-153 is brown.

Miscellanea (MS)

[10] Internal relation between fols 143-144/153-154 (‘Thus I thinke’) and fols 145-152 (‘Of Ethick in General’). There is no evidence to suggest that the leaves of the two texts were were originally quired together. The different quire patterns (see [5]), size of the folios and puncture patterns (see [4]) all suggest that MS Locke c.28 fols 143-154 comprises not one but two manuscripts, the first consisting of fols 143-144 and 153-154 containing ‘Thus I thinke’, formula A 4; and the second consisting of fols 145-152, containing ‘Of Ethick in General’, formula A-D 2.

Milton, ‘Manservant as Amanuensis: Sylvester Brounower’, p. 81.
The place that Locke prescribes here is indeed the place that it has been given both in C-1706 and in the present edition; this place results once his instructions in MS Locke e.1 pp. 113-114 concerning the introductory paragraphs on pp. 114-116 of the same manuscript are carried out (see below, 1. Of the Conduct of the Understanding (1697-1704) [23]).
In the present edition, this sentence is given in the collation of MS Locke e.1 with MS Locke c.28.’
Cf. Heawood, 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.