MS Locke d.3

 

Contents of this manuscript description

Introduction

Size

Watermarks

Stitching and pins

Quires and page numbers

Contents

Marginal entries

Catchwords

Scribes/Ink

Corrections and additions

Texts within this manuscript

5. Of seeing all things in God [=An Examination of P. Malebranche’s Opinion] (1693) pp. 1-86 [about]

3. Some other loose thoughts [=Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris’s Books], 1693 pp. 89-109 [about]

 

Introduction

[1] Pp. 112. Paper. Twenty-eight unbound half sheets, each half sheet folded vertically to form a quire consisting of two leaves, each leaf divided by a vertical fold. The main text is entered on the left-hand side of the pages, while the right-hand side is reserved for additions, corrections and marginal entries.

Size

[2] Sizes are not of the leaves but of the complete half sheets. The first seventeen half sheets (quires A-R) measure between 341 and 344 × 223 mm and the last eleven (quires S-DD) measure between 336 and 339 × 218 mm.

Watermarks

[3] All sheets have the same watermark and countermark. Watermark: horn in coat of arms, followed, in vertical order, by a large ‘4’, a combination of the letters ‘W’ and ‘R’, and the letters ‘AB’. Countermark: ‘HIB’.

Stitching and pins

[4] Quires B-K are punctured by a small hole that decreases in size on the lower right edge of the recto side (=lower left edge of the verso side) of the leafs. No other signs of stitching and pins are visible.

Quires and page numbers

[5] Formula: A-Z AA-DD2. Each of the 28 quires has its signature at the bottom of the right-hand side of its first page. No quire J or U. The number of the first page of each quire is: A 1; B 5; C 9; D 13; E 17; F 21; G 25; H 29; I 33; K 37; L 41; M 45; N 49; O 53; P 57; Q 61; R 65; S 69; T 73; V 77; W 81; X 85; Y 89; Z 93; AA 97; BB 101; CC 105; DD 109. Most pages have been given a number by the scribe, in ink, at the upper outer corners. Page numbers 2 and 87 are missing (probably because the corner of the leaf has worn off). Page numbers 90, 92, 110 and 112 are absent as well. The Bodleian librarian added the missing page numbers 3 and 111 in pencil. The last three pages, 110-112, do not contain text. On page p. 89 starts ‘Some other loose thoughts’. This text was originally numbered with a separate series, starting with 1. This series was deleted by superimposition. The superimposed series forms a continuation of the series on the 88 previous pages. The editors have ignored the incomplete and discarded series in favour of the new series for which Locke himself opted eventually. Numbers in this preferred series that are missing have been supplied in italics by the editors. The relation between the discarded/retained series is as follows (cancelled numbers between square brackets): 2/90 ; [3]/91; 4/92; [5]/93; 6/94; [7]/95; 8/96; [9]/97; [10]/98.

Contents

[6] ‘Of seeing all things in God’, pp. 1-86 (first published in 1706 by Peter King as An Examination of P. Malebranche’s Opinion of Seeing All Things In God in PW, pp. 140-213); and ‘Some other loose thoughts which I set down as they came in my way in a hasty perusal of some of Mr Norris’s writeings, to be better digested when I shall have leisure to make an End of this Argument’, pp. 89-109 (first published in 1720 by Pierre Des Maizeaux as Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris’s Books, Wherein he asserts F. Malebranche’s Opinion of our seeing all things in God in SP, pp. 153-176).

Marginal entries

[7] Three kinds of entries appear on the right-hand side of the manuscript pages. (1) Section numbers. In ‘Of seeing all things in God’, section numbers 1-3 are given not in the margin but rather at the start of the section, but the number of section 4 is given both at the start of the section and in the margin, and the numbers of all subsequent sections of this text are given in the margin. The number of sect. 27 was forgotten and has been supplied by the editors. The first section of ‘Loose thoughts’ starts with its number in the main text, but the numbers of the other sections are given in the margin. (2) Detailed references (by book, part, chapter or page number) to works (by Malebranche and Norris) that are mentioned in the main text. These references are all in the same colour of ink, and were probably entered after Locke had entered the section numbers. In the present edition, these references will be presented conjointly with the text to which they are keyed. (3) ‘Of seeing’ has the following series of progressively numbered entries: p. 2: ‘Malbranche’; p. 20: ‘Malbrnch [sic] 3’; p. 25: ‘Malebranche: 4’; p. 30: ‘Malbranch 5’; p. 36: ‘Malbranch 6’; p. 42: ‘Malbranch 7’; p. 49: ‘Malbranch 8’; p. 54: ‘Malbranch 9’; p. 60: ‘Malbranch 10’; p. 65: ‘Malbranch 11’; p. 70: ‘Malbranch 12’; p. 76: ‘Malbranch 13’; p. 81: ‘Malbranch 14’; p. 86: ‘Malbranch 15’. These entries appear at various heights of the relevant margin and they have no obvious connection with the text next to which they are entered, yet their occurance is not random. The distance between each entry and its successor, with the exception of the first and the second entry, is either five or six pages. The entries possibly refer to the quire numbers of an earlier version of the text.

Catchwords

[8] Most pages have a catchword. In the few cases they do not, there is no evidence of discontinuity in the text.

Scribes/Ink

[9] The main text of ‘Of seeing’ and of ‘Loose thoughts’ is entered by the same hand and is of a scribe other than Locke (see ill. 11). The hand of Locke is visible, though, in corrections and additions to both texts, but much more prominently in the former text than in the latter. His entries in the first text are frequently in a different colour of ink than that of the ink used by his scribe. Page numbers in MS Locke d.3 were probably entered not by Locke but by the scribe. The change in colour of ink of the page numbers follows changes in the colour of ink of the main text; see table 5. Hence it is plausible to assume that the scribe of the main text was also responsible for the page numbers. The changing colour pattern of the ink can also be used to reconstruct the relation between the letters entered for the quires and the marginal section numbers, see table 6. This table allows us to conclude that the letters of quires and the marginal section numbers were probably entered by the same person. It is likely that this person was Locke himself, not his scribe. The letters of the quires seem to be in Locke’s hand, and differences between the page numbers and the section numbers point in the same direction. For instance, whereas the upper horizontal stroke of the ‘5’ tends to point upwards in the hand of the scribe, it mostly slides downwards in Locke’s hand. The pattern in ‘Of seeing’ on pp. 1-86, continues in ‘Loose thoughts’ on pp. 89-109; hence it is likely that the same division of tasks between Locke and his scribe was maintained from p. 89 onwards. The marginal references to works by Malebranche and Norris (see [7] (2)) and the marginal references to earlier versions of ‘Of seeing’ and ‘Loose thoughts’ (see [7] (3)), both of which are written in the same black ink, are probably in the hand of Locke’s scribe. In addition, differences in the colour of ink suggest that when Locke corrected the part of the manuscript that contains ‘Of seeing’, he added interpunction and also added underscores. The identity of the scribe is uncertain; Long, p. 32, mentions Sylvester Brounower, but a comparison with the letters written by Brounower to Locke (see MS Locke c.4, fols 176-192) does not seem to warrant this claim. The verdict of Milton, ‘Manservant as Amanuensis’, p. 82, is that MS Locke d.3 is one of two ‘manuscripts which were probably not written by Brounower, but about which it is difficult to be absolutely certain’. Finally, there are three small additions in pencil in ‘Of seeing’ (all in section 34) and a Latin remark followed by a quotation from Lucan in the margin of ‘Some other Thoughts’ (sect. 11), also in pencil. These pencil insertions are probably in a hand that belonged neither to Locke nor to that of his scribe. After Locke’s death, MS Locke d.3 came into the possession of Peter King. King may have been the author of the pencilled insertion. One of these additions was included in his edition of this text in PW.

Corrections and additions

[10] For corrections and additions see [7].

Milton, ‘Manservant as Amanuensis: Sylvester Brounower’, p. 81.
The place that Locke prescribes here is indeed the place that it has been given both in C-1706 and in the present edition; this place results once his instructions in MS Locke e.1 pp. 113-114 concerning the introductory paragraphs on pp. 114-116 of the same manuscript are carried out (see below, 1. Of the Conduct of the Understanding (1697-1704) [23]).
In the present edition, this sentence is given in the collation of MS Locke e.1 with MS Locke c.28.’
Cf. Heawood, 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.