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15. ‘Monsieur Menage’ (c. 1699)

Section 1 (of 1)

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Monsieur Menage fournishes us with an example worth the takeing notice of on this occasion. When the Abbot of StMartin says he, was borne he had soelittle thefigure of aman thatit bespake himrathera monstre.Twas for some time under deliberation whether heshouldbebaptisedor noe.However hewasbaptised and declared a manprovisionaly [till time should shew what he would prove] Naturehad mouldedhim soeuntowardlythat he was called all his life the Abbot MalotruorIlshapd.He was of Caen Menagiana p 278/430 This child we see was very near being excluded out of the Species of man barely by his shape. He scaped very narrowly as he was and tis certain a figure a little more odly turnd had cast him and he had been ex ecuted as a thing not to be allowed to passe for a man, and yet there can be noe reason given why if the lineaments of his face had been a little alterd, a rational soule could not have been lodgd in him why a visagea little longer or a nose flatter or a wider mouth could not have consisted as well as the rest of his ill figure with such a soule such parts as made him, disfugred as he was, capable to be a dignitary in the Church

Diplomatic

184

Monsieur Menage fournishes us with an example worth the takeing notice of on this occasion. When the Abbot of StMartin says he, was borne he had soelittle the figure of aman thathe wasit bespake himratherlikea monstre.Twas for some time under deliberation whether heshouldbebaptisedor noe.At length heHowever hewaswasbaptised and declared a manprovisionaly [till time should shew what he would prove] Naturehad mouldedhim soeawkwardlyuntowardlythat he was called all his life the Abbot Malotruor  ilIlshapd.He was of Caen Menagiana p 278/430 This child we see was very near being excluded out of the Species of man barely by his shape. He scaped very narrowly as he was and tis certain a figure figure a little alteration more odly turnd had cast him and he had been ex ecuted as a monster a thing not to be allowed to passe for a man, and yet there can be noe reason given why if the lineaments of his face had been a little alterd, if he a rational soule could not have been lodgd in him why a face visagea little  flatter longer or a nose flatter or a wider mouth could not have consisted as well as the rest of his ill figure with such a soule such parts as made him, disfugred as he was, not unfit capable to be a dignitary in the Church


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This draft was marked by Locke in MS e.1 with a reference to the third edition: (‘p. 254. l. 37 —— humane species’); the draft was included after this passage in the fourth edition, Essay, III.vi.26.

little the] 4: little of the

or] 4: i.e.

a little] 4: somewhat
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