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11. Enthusiasm (1695-1697)

Section 1 (of 16)

Normalized

Enthusiasm

He that would seriou<s>ly set upon the search of Truth ought in the first place to prepare his mind with a love of it for he that loves it not will not take much pains to get it, nor be much concernd when he misses it. There is noe-body in the commonwealth of learning that does not professe him self a Lover of Truth and there is not a rational creature that would not take it amisse to be thought otherwise of, And yet for all this one may truly say there are very few lovers of truth for truths sake even amongst those who perswad them selves that they are soe. How a man shall know whether he be soe in earnest is worth his enquire and I think there is this one unerring marke of it viz the not enterteining any proposition with greater assurance than the proofs it is built upon will warrant. who ever goes beyond this measure of assent tis plain receives not truth in the love of it, Loves not truth for truths sake but for some other bye end. For the evidence that any proposition is true lieing only in the proofs a man has of it, what so ever degrees of assent we afford it beyond the degrees of that evidence tis plain all that surplussage of assurance is oweing to some other affection and not to the love of truth. It being as impossible that the love of truth should cary my assent above the evidence there is to me that it is True as that the Love of truth should make me assent to any proposition because of that evidence which it has not that it is true which is in effect to love it as a Truth because it is possible or probable that it may not be True.In any Truth that is not let into our minds by the irresistible light of self evidence or of Demonstration The arguments that gain itour assent are the Vouchers and gage of its probabilitie to us. and we can receive it for noe other than such as they deliver it to our understandings.what so ever authority we give it more than it receive s from the principles it is built on is oweing to our inclinations to that side and is soe far a derogation from the love of truth as such: which as it can receive noe evidence from our passions or interest soe it should receive noe tincture from them.

Diplomatic

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Enthusiasm

He that would seriou<s>ly set upon the search of Truth ought in the first place to prepare his mind with a love of it for he that loves it not will not take much pains to get it, nor be much concernd when he misses it. There is noe-body in the commonwealth of learning that  does not professe him self a Lover of Truth and there is not a rational creature that would not take it amisse to be thought otherwise of, And yet for all this one may truly say there are very few lovers of truth for truths sake even amongst those who perswad them selves that they are soe. How a man shall  know whether he be soe in earnest is worth his enquire  and I think there is this one unerring marke of it viz the not enterteining any proposition with greater assurance than the proofs it is built upon will warrant. who ever goes beyond this measure of assent receives tis plain receives not truth in the love of it, Loves not truth for truths sake but for some other bye end. For the evidence that any proposition is true lieing  only in

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the proofs a man has of it, what so ever gree degrees of assent we afford  it beyond the degrees of that evidence tis plain all that assent surplussage of assent assurance is oweing to some other affection and not to the love of truth. It being as impossible that the love of truth should cary my assent above the evidence there  is to me that it is True as that water should be raised by its owne weigh and force higher than its spring True as that the Love of truth should make me assent to any proposition because  of that evidence which it has not that it is true which is in effect to love it as a Truth because it may is possible or probable that it may not be True.In all any Truth s that are issetled in our not let into  our minds by the irresistible light of self evidence or of  Demonstration The arguments for them are the vouchers of their probability that pr.... us to receive them that gain over that gain their itour  assent are the Vouchers and gage of their its probabilitie to us. and we can receive them it for noe other there than such as they deliver them it to our understandings.what so ever authority  we give it  them more than they it receive s from the principles they are it is built on  is oweing to our inclinations to that side  and is soe far a derogation from the love of truth as such: which as it can receive noe evidence from our passions or interest  soe it should receive noe tincture or bias from them.


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The place of this draft in the Essay was marked by Locke in MS e.1 with a reference to the third edition ('p. 398. l. 5'). Included in the fourth edition of the Essay, IV.xix.1-4, 'Of Enthusiasm'.

that] 4: who

man shall] 4: Man may

his enquire] 4: enquiry

true lieing] 4: true (except such as are self-evident) lying

we afford] 4: he affords

evidence there] 4: Evidence, that there

because] 4: for the sake

issetled in our not let into] 4: gets not possession of

or of] 4: or by the force of

our] 4: om.

what so ever authority] 4: Whatsoever Credit or Authority

give it] 4: give to any proposition

principles they are it is built on] 4: principles and proofs it supports itself upon

to that side] 4: that way

interest] 4: Interests
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