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4. Recherche (c. 1693)

Section 1 (of 1)

Normalized

Recherche

l. 3 p. 190 c 1

Things material being extended and the soule not being. There is noe proportion between them and soe they cannot be united and soe the soule cannot see them

Q How then can they see figure and bulke in god. for neither of those Ideas in god can be without extension. The soule cannot be united to matter but is readily suposed unitable to god, which yet is as hard to be conceivd as the other and as much needs explication

They can not be united after the maner which is necessary that the minde may perceive them

What is that maner of union needs explication. In the meantime I thinke we may say that any thing united any way to the minde is united in that manner which is necessary to produce in the mind any perception in god has appointed it to produce

Besides our soules goe not out of our bodys to measure the greatnesse of the heavens and therefor they see not bodys that are without but by Ideas that represent them

Agreed

The Ideas of objects which we perceive not by them selves

What are they?

c 2. p. 193

Ideas are beings real and spiritual. real because they have real properties. Spiritual because noebody can doubt of it

Yet as motion is real and the great efficacy of nature which yet <h>as noe lasting existance but ceases as soon as it exites

Ideas are not substances but a spirituall thing

Noe they are not modes because they are in god and there we see them. I appeal therefor to my reader whether that hypothesis be not to be preferd for its easinesse to be understood which is explaind by reall beings that are neither substances nor modes?

c2. 194 196

Ideas of sens and imagination distinguished from Ideas of pure understanding. v. g. the Idea of a square in the imagination and the Idea of a square which we conceive by pure intellection

I would fain know the difference between these those which the author gives is none.

p. 195

Ideas are real things that exist when they are not perceived

As soon as the object is present men see it

Q What is this presence

Because Ideas are present in their minde as soon as they will it they should only conclude that according to the Order of nature their wills are Ordinarily necessary to their haveing these Ideas

This is a wrong foundation of Occasional causes on which that hypothesis will not stand, for first the will is not ordinarily necessary to haveing of Ideas every one almost dayly experimenting the comeing of great numbers of Ideas (besides those of actuall sensation) into his minde without his willing it. And next many have not the Ideas they will which shews the will in remembering is not the occasional cause of the comeing of any Idea for then noe body could have a bad memory for desireing to retreive any past Idea being the occasional (if that were the true) cause. god if he had established that order and operated by it must as constantly produce the Idea in the minde of him that wills it as he moves one bowle on occasion of an other which in its motion finds it in its way

c 5. p 198

God has created the world according to Ideas that he had, These Ideas are him self and therfor all creatures even the material are in god but in a spiritual maner

This spiritual maner carys I fear with it noe positive Idea at all, but only signifies that material creatures are in god not materialy

Diplomatic

159r

Recherche

l. 3 p. 190 c 1

Things material being extended and the soule not being. There is noe proportion between them and soe they cannot be united and soe the soule cannot see them They cannot be united after a manner which is

Q How then can they see figure and bulke in god. for neither of those Ideas in god can be without extension. The soule cannot be united to matter but is easily . readily suposed unitable to god, which yet is as hard to be conceivd as the other and as much needs explication

They can not be united after the maner which is necessary that the minde may perceive them

What is that maner of union needs explication. In the meantime I thinke we may say that any thing united any way to the minde is united in athat manner which is necessary to produce in the mind any perception in god has appointed it to produce

Besides our soules goe not out of our bodys to measure the greatnesse of the heavens and therefor they see not bodys that are without but by Ideas that represent them

Agreed

The Ideas of objects which we perceive not by them selves

What are they?

c 2. p. 193

Ideas are beings real and spiritual. real because they have real properties. Spiritual because noebody can doubt of it

Yet as motion is real and the great efficacy of nature which yet <h>as noe lasting existance but ceases as soon as it exites

Ideas are not substances but a spirituall thing

Noe they are not modes because they are in god and there we see them. I appeal therefor to my reader whether that hypothesis be not to be preferd for its easinesse to be understood which

159v

which is explaind by reall beings that are neither substances nor modes?

159r

c2. 194 196

Ideas of sens and imagination distinguished from Ideas of pure understanding. v. g. the Idea of a square in the imagination and the Idea of a square which we conceive by pure intellection

I would fain know the difference between these those which the author gives is none.

159v

p. 195

Ideas are real things that exist when they are not perceived

presence of the object the occasi<on> As soon as the object is present men see it

Q What is this presence

Because Ideas are present in their minde as soon as they will it they should only conclude that according to the Order of nature their wills are Ordinarily necessary to their haveing these Ideas

This is a wrong foundation of Occasional causes on which that hypothesis will not stand, for first the will is not ordinarily ordinarily necessary to haveing of Ideas noe one every one almost dayly experimenting the comeing of Ideas into his minde .. great numbers of Ideas (besides those of actuall sensation) into his minde without his willing it. And next many have not the Ideas they will which shews the will in remembering is not the occasional cause of the comeing of any Idea for then noe body could have a bad memory for desireing to retreive any past Idea being the occasional cause (if that were the true) cause. god if he would op had established that order and operated by it must as constantly produce the Idea in the minde of him that wills it as he moves one biliard ball at the constantly on the occasion of the stroke of an other bowle on occasion of an other which in its motion finds it in its way

c 5. p 198

God has created the world according to Ideas that he had, These Ideas are him self and therfor all creatures even the material are in god but in a spiritual maner

This spiritual maner carys I fear with it noe positive Idea at all, but only signifies that material creatures are in god not materialy


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Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.i, p.190: ‘…parce qu’étant étenduës, & l’ame ne l’étant pas, il n’y a point de proportion entr’elles’.
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.i, p. 190: ‘Mais je parle principalement ici des choses matérielles qui certainement ne peuvent s’unir à nôtre ame, de la façon qui est nécessaire afin qu’elle les apperçoive…’
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.1, p. 190: ‘Outre que nos ames ne sortent point du corps pour mesurer la grandeur des cieux, & par conséquent elles ne peuvent voir les corps de dehors, que par des idées qui les représentent.’
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.1, p 190: ‘Mais je parle principalement ici des choses matérielles qui certainement ne peuvent s’unir à nôtre ame, de la façon qui est nécessaire afin qu’elle les apperçoive: parce qu’étant étenduës, & l’ame ne l’étant pas, il n’y a point de rapport entr’elles.’
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.iii, p. 193: ‘Personne ne peut douter que les idées ne soient des êtres-réels, puisqu’elles ont des proprietez réelles; que les unes ne different des autres, & qu’elles ne représentent des choses toutes différentes. On ne peut aussi raisonnablement douter qu’elles ne soient spirituelles, & fort différentes des corps qu’elles représentent.’
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.iii, p. 193: ‘Que si on dit, qu’une idée n’est pas une substance, je le veux; mais c’est toûjours une chose spirituelle…’
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.iii, p. 193: ‘…& comme il n’est pas possible de faire un quarré d’un esprit, quoi qu’un quarré ne soit pas une substance: il n’est pas possible aussi de former d’une substance materiélle une idée spirituelle, quand même une idée ne seroit pas une substance.’
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.iii, p. 195: ‘…qu’ils s’imaginent que les idées ne sont plus, dés que l’esprit ne les voit plus, & qu’elles recommencent à exister, lorsqu’elles se représentent à l’esprit.’
This Malebranchean tenet not followed by a Lockean comment.
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.iii, p. 195: ‘Car n’étant pas possible de voir les objets par eux-mêmes, mais seulement par leurs idées, ils jugent que l’objet produit l’idée: parce que, dés qu’il est présent, ils le voyent: dés qu’ils est absent, ils ne le voyent plus; & que la présence de l’objet accompagne presque toûjours l’idée qui nous le représente.’
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.iii, p. 195: ‘Toutefois, si les hommes ne se précipitoient point dans leurs jugemens; de ce que les idées des choses sont présentes à leur esprit dés qu’ils le veulent, ils devroient seulement conclure, que selon l’ordre de la nature, leur volonté est ordinairement nécessaire, afin qu’ils ayent ces idées; mais non pas que la volonté est la véritable & la principale cause qui les rende présentes à leur esprit, & encore moins que la volonté les produise de rien ou de la maniére qu’ils l’explique.’
Cf. the opening sentence of the ‘Conduct’: ‘The last resort a man has recourse to in the conduct of himself is his understanding for though we distinguish the faculties of the minde and give the supreme command to the Will as to an agent yet the truth is the man which is the agent determins him self to this or that voluntary action upon some precedent knowledg or appearance of knowledge in the understanding.’
Malebranche, Recherche, III.II.v, p. 198: ‘Il est indubitable qu’il n’y avoit que Dieu seul avant que le monde fût créé, & qu’il n’a pû le produire sans connoisssance & sans idée: que par conséquent ces idées que Dieu en a euës ne sont point différentes de lui-même & qu’ainsi toutes les créatures, mêmes les plus materielles & les plus terrestres, sont en Dieu, quoi que d’une maniere toute spirituelle & que nous ne pouvons comprendre.’
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reall ornall (=naturall)?
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