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9. Ethica C (c. 1692-c. 1696)

Section 1 (of 1)

Normalized

infinitum. therefor the happinesse of the most lasting estate is to be preferd only as possible, for all future is but possible, therefor that the greater barely possible happynesse is to be preferd is demonstration. The greater probability of equall happynesse is to be preferd is demonstration

Happynesse

Happynesse is a continuation of content without any molestation.

Very imperfect in this world noe body happy here, certein. May be perfect in an other world possible, probable

The greatest happynesse atteinable in this world to be preferd corrolary from the postulation. That is vertue To be demonstrated

Censure

We should not have one measure for our self and others if we forgive our own slips much more those of others and ought not to require any body to be perfect but our selves, ought not to be angry that

There is being and there is happinesse and misery. one the foundation of truth the other the end and rule of action. Every being capable of happinesse or misery acts for the avoiding of one to make way for the other. Happinesse and misery consist in and are made up of noe thing but pleasure and pain

Happynesse

is the enjoyment of pleasure in such a degree exceeding all present uneasinesse that a man would be content with the continuation of his being in such an estate to eternity

Perfect Happynesse

is the enjoyment of pleasure without any manner of uneasinesse

Misery

is an uneasinesse soe far exceeding all a mans present enjoyment of pleasure that he would not be content to continue in such an estate to eternity

Perfect Misery

is such a degree of uneasinesse as wholy extinguishes all pleasure whatsoever.

In both kindes there may be infinite degrees

Law

The originall and foundation of all law is dependency. A dependent intelligent being is under the power and direction and dominion of him on whom he depends and must be for the ends appointed him by that superior being. If man were independent he could have noe law but his own will noe end but him self. He would be a god to himself; and the satisfaction of his own will the sole measure and end of all his actions

Ethica B

Diplomatic

141r

infinitum. therefor the happinesse of the most lasting estate is to be preferd only as possible, for all future is but possible, therefor that the greater barely possible happynesse is to be preferd is demonstration. The greater probable greater probability of equall happynesse is to be preferd is demonstration

Def Happynesse

Happynesse is a continuation of content without any molestation.

Very imperfect in this world noe body happy here, certein. May be perfect in an other world possible, probable

The greatest happynesse atteinable in this world to be preferd postu<lation> corrolary from the postulation. That is vertue Demonstration. To be demonstrated

Censure

We should not have one measure for our self and others if we forgive our own slips much more those of others and ought not to require any body to be perfect but our self selves, ought not to be angry that

There is being and there is happinesse and misery. one the foundation of truth the other the end and rule of action. Every being capable of happinesse or misery acts for the avoiding of one to make way for the other. Happinesse and misery consist in and are made up of noe thing but pleasure and pain

Happynesse

is the enjoyment of such an over plus of pleasure as ... pleasure in such a degree exceeding any all present uneasinesse that a man would be content with the continuation of his being in such an estate to eternity

Perfect Happynesse

is the enjoyment of pleasure without any manner of uneasinesse

Misery

is an uneasinesse soe far exceeding all a mans present enjoyment of pleasure that he would not be content to continue in such an estate to eternity

Perfect Misery

is such a degree of uneasinesse as wholy extinguishes and hinders the sense of any present all pleasure whatsoever.

Between these there may Between the lowest degree and that which is In both kindes there may be infinite degrees

Law

The originall and foundation of all law is dependency. An ind dependent intelligent being is under the power and direction and dominion of him on whom he depends and must be for the ends appointed him by that superior being. If man were independent he could have noe law but his own will noe end but him self. He would be a god to himself; and the satisfaction of his own will the sole measure and end of all his actions and the end of all his aims

141r

Ethica B


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Cf. ‘Of Ethick in General’, in Goldie, p. 301: ‘For rewards and punishments are the good and evil whereby superiors enforce the observance of their laws…’
Locke’s endorsement, repated on fol. 142v.
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