About this text   Help

7. Thus I thinke (1692?)

Section 1 (of 1)

Normalized

Thus I thinke

Tis a mans proper businesse to seeke happynesse and avoid misery

Happynesse consists in what delights and contents the minde, misery in what disturbs discomposes or torments it.

I will therefor make it my businesse to seeke satisfaction and delight and avoid uneasinesse and disquiet and to have as much of the one and as litle of the other as may be.

But here I must have a care I mistake not. for if I prefer a short pleasure to a lasting one tis plain I crosse my owne happynesse.

Let me then see where in consists the most lasting pleasures of this life and that as far as I can observe is in these things

1º Health, without which noe sensuall pleasure can have any relish

2º Reputation for that I finde every body is pleased with and the want of it is a constant torment

3º Knowledg for the litle knowledg I have I finde would not sell at any rate nor part with for any other pleasure

4º Doeing good For I finde the well cookd meat I eat today does now noe more delight me nay I am diseasd after a full meal. The parfumes I smelt yesterday now noe more affect me with any pleasure. But the good turne I did yesterday a year seven year since continues still to please and delight me as often as I reflect on it.

5º The expectacion of Eternall and incomprehensible happynesse in an other world is that also which carys a constant pleasure with it

If then I will faithfully pursue that happynesse I propose to my self, what ever pleasure offers it self to me I must carefully looke that it crosse not any of those 5 great and constant pleasures above mentiond. For example the fruit I see tempts me with the taste of it that I love. but if it endanger my health I part with a constant and lasting for a very short and transient pleasure and soe foolishly make my self unhappy and am not true to my owne interest.Hunting, plays and other innocent diversions delight me If I make use of them to refresh my self after Study and businesse. they preserve my health, restore the vigor of my minde and increase my pleasure. But if I spend all or the greatest part of my time in them they hinder my improvement in knowledg and usefull arts, they blast my credit and give me up to the uneasy state of shame ignorance and contempt in which I can not but be very unhappy.Drinkeing gameing and vitious delights will doe me this mischeif not only by wanting my time, but by a positive efficacy endanger my health, impair my parts, imprint ill habits lessen my esteem and leave a constant lasting torment on my conscience.

Therefor all vitious and unlawfull pleasures I will always avoid because such a mastery of my passions will afford me a constant pleasure greater then any such enjoyments and also deliver me from the certain evill of severall kindes that by indulgeing my self in a present temptation I shall certainly afterwards suffer.

All innocent diversions and delights as far as they will contribute to my health and consist with my improvement condition and my other more solid pleasures of knowledge and reputation I will enjoy, but noe farther and this I will carefully watch and examine that I may not be deceived by the flattery of a present pleasure to loose a greater.

Diplomatic

1

Thus I thinke

Tis a mans proper businesse to seeke happynesse and avoid misery

Happynesse consists in what delights and contents the minde, misery in what disturbs discomposes or torments it.

There are sensuall delights pleasures which begin in the body. And there are the higher delights of the minde such as of eating drinkeing hearing musick seeing fine shews etc These though most by mistake most sought yet are the and may be injoyd and should be enjoyd yet when they cary not more pain then pleasure These I thinke ar e I am not to deny my self but I must take care that I suffer not more evill pain and losse of pleasure by the consequences that it draws after it then I enjoy of receive of pleasure in the enjoyment of any one of them, for then I make a foolish choise and prefer misery to happynesse

I will therefor make it my businesse to seeke satisfaction and delight and avoid uneasinesse and disquiet and to have as much of the one and as litle of the other as may be.

But here I must have a care I mistake not. for if I prefer a short pleasure to a lasting one tis plain I crosse my owne happynesse.

Let me then see where in consists

2

the most lasting pleasures of this life and that as far as I can observe is in these things

1º Health, without which noe sensuall pleasure can have any relish

2º Reputation for that I finde every body is pleased with and the want of it is a constant torment

3º Knowledg for the litle knowledg I have I finde would not part w<ith> sell at any rate nor part with for any other pleasure

4º Doeing good For I finde the well cookd meat I eat today does now noe more delight me nay I am diseasd after a full meal. The parfumes I smelt yesterday now noe more delight me affect me with any pleasure. But the good turne I did yesterday a year seven year since continues still to please and delight me as often as I reflect on it.

5º The expectacion of Eternall and incomprehensible happynesse in an other world is that also which carys a constant pleasure with it

If then I will direct my actions to faithfully pursue that happynesse I propose to my self, what ever pleasure offers it self to me I must carefully looke that it crosse not any of those 5 great and constant pleasures above mentiond. For example the fruit I see tempts .... me with the taste of it that I love. but if it endanger my health I part with a constant for and lasting for a very a very short and transient pleasure and soe foolishly make

3

my self . unhappy and am not true to my owne interest.Hunting, drinkeing, gameing and plays and other innocent diversions delight me If I make use of them to refresh my self and after Study and businesse. they increase preserve my health, restore the vigor of my minde and increase my pleasure. But if I spend all my or the greatest part of my time of in them they ...... of hinder my improvement in knowledg and usefull arts, they blast my credit and give me up to the miserabl.. uneasy state of shame ignorance and contempt in which I can not but be very unhappy.Drinkeing play gameing and vitious delights will doe this me this mischeif not only most effectually by wanting my time, but by a positive efficacy destroy endanger my health, lessen my esteeme lessen nay part impair my parts, imprint ill habits lessen my esteem and leave a constant lasting torment on my conscience.

Therefor all vitious and unlawfull pleasures I will always avoid because such a mastery of my passions will afford me a constant pleasure greater then any such enjoyments and also deliver me from the certain evill of severall kindes that by indulgeing my self in a present temptation I shall certainly afterwards suffer.

4

All . innocent diversions and delights as far as they will contribute to my health and consist with my improvement condition and my other more solid pleasures of knowledge and reputation I will enjoy, but noe farther and this I will carefully watch and examine that I may not be deceived by the flattery of a present pleasure to loose a greater.


Locke’s texts are presented simultaneously in their normalized ‘clean’ version and in a diplomatic version that includes all additions and deletions. The normalized version includes philosophical and historical notes by the editor that can be consulted by clicking on the [n] symbol in the text. The additions in the diplomatic version are given in bold type, their start is marked by a —> and their end by a <—. Deletions are given in grey type, their start is marked by a square opening bracket and their end by a square closing bracket. The structure of nested additions, i.e. additions within additions, can be traced by following the pattern of opening and closing arrows within arrows. Similarly, the structure of nested deletions can be traced by following the patern of opening and closing square brackets. Red arrows signal additional text-critical information that becomes available by hovering with the cursor of the mouse on the arrow. New page numbers in the manuscript are marked between square brackets. The present version of the DLP database is a beta; more information, including ‘Help’ information, will follow soon in the complete version.
For a similar discussion of long-term pleasures see ‘Ethica A’.
1, 2, 3 Section numbering; hover to see to which system it refers
sample Marginal note in manuscript
Folio or page break in Locke’s manuscript (normalized text); hover to view the folio number; click to synchronize the diplomatic text. This icon is also used in the diplomatic text to indicate pagebreaks within additions that run across folios.
1 Folio or page break in Locke’s manuscript (diplomatic text); click to synchronize the normalized text. Note that pagebreaks within additions are marked by the icon above.
1 Special folio break; view details by hovering this tag; click to synchronize the normalized text
Line break in Locke’s manuscript
Note containing editorial comments (note in normalized text) or comments on the transcription (note in diplomatic text); click to view the note
sample Note on the transcription attached not to a single point but to a range; the note tag is connected to an anchor tag with the same ID; ID’s can be viewed by hovering the tags
, sample Note on collation of variant readings; click to view
sample Addition in Locke’s manuscript
sample Addition within an addition
sample Special addition; view details by hovering the tag
sample Special addition within an addition; view details by hovering the tag
<sample> Editorial addition
sample. Editorial stop
sample Deletion in Locke’s manuscript
sample Deletion within a deletion
sample Special deletion; view details by hovering the tag
sample Special deletion within an deletion; view details by hovering the tag
sample Editorial deletion
sample Unclear text in Locke’s manuscript
sample ... sample Gap in Locke’s manuscript that is 3 characters wide