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10. Ethica B (1693-1694)

Section 1 (of 1)

Normalized

Ethica

There be two parts of Ethicks, the one is the rule which men are generally in the right in though perhaps they have not deduced them as they should from their true principles. The other is the true motives to practise them and the ways to bring men to observe them and these are generaly either not well known or not rightly applyd. Without this lat ter moral discourses are such as men hear with pleasure and approve of. The minde being generally delighted with truth espetialy if handsomely expressed. But all this is but the delight of speculation. Something else is required to practise, which will never be till men are made alive to virtue and can tast it. To doe this one must consider what is each mans particular disease, what is the pleasure that possesses him. Over that general discourses will never get a mastery. But by all the prevalencys of freindship all the arts of perswasion he is to be brought to trie the contrary course. you must bring him to practise in particular instances and soe by habits establish a contrary pleasure. and then when Conscience. Reason, and Pleasure goe togeather they are sure to prevaile. Which is the way to doe this in particular cases will be easier for a prudent man to finde when the case offers then for any one to foresee and determin before the case happens and the person be known. JL.

Diplomatic

113r

Ethica

There be two parts of Ethicks, the one is the rule which men are generally in the right in though perhaps they have not deduced them as they should from their true principles. The other .. is the true motives to practise them and the ways to bring men to observe them and these are generaly either not well known. or not rightly applyd. Without this lat ter moral discourses are such as men hear with pleasure and approve of. The minde being generally delighted with truth espetialy if handsomely expressed. But all this is but the delight of speculation. Something else is required to practise, which will never be till men are made alive to virtue and can tast it. To doe this one must consider what is each mans particular disease, what is the pleasure that possesses him. Over that general discourses will never get a mastery. But by all the prevalencys of freindship all the arts of perswasion he is to be brought to trie the contrary course. you must bring him to practise in particular instances and soe by habits establish a contrary pleasure. and then when Conscience. Reason, and Pleasure goe togeather they are sure to prevaile. Which is the way to doe this in particular cases will be easier for a prudent man to finde when the case offers then for any one to foresee and determin before the case happens and the person be known. JL.


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