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5. Of seeing all things in God [=An Examination of P. Malebranche’s Opinion] (1693)

Section 1 (of 60)

Normalized

1 Some men are soe well conceited of their own knowledg, that they cannot beare the thought of being ignorant of any thing, espetially concerning any subject, they have once thought fit to take into their consideration, imploy their pen about, and in it give the world a sample of their parts, and penetration. I who am very willing to allow every one as good an opinion, as he pleases of himself thinke it not strange that men should be satisfied with their own tenents. I wonder not that they are assured, that every thing is just as they imagin, and are pleased with their owne full and cleare views of things, and their way of Explaining them: But when they make their understandings the measure to others, and a man cannot be permitted to owne his ignorance without their leave, one is forced to looke into their hypotheseis, either to admire the clearnesse and demonstration where with it carys all before it, or the Insolence where-with they would impose it, and expect every one should submissively receive it.

Diplomatic

1

Some men are soe well conceited of their own knowledg, that they cannot beare the thought of being ignorant of any thing, espetially concerning any subject, they have once thought fit to take into their consideration, imploy their pen about, and in it give the world a sample of their parts, and penetration. I who am very willing to allow every one as good an opinion, as he pleases of himself thinke, it not strange that men should be satisfied with their own tenents. I wonder not that they are assured, that every thing is just as they imagin, and are pleased with their owne full and cleare views of things, and their way of Explaining them: But when they make their understandings the measure to others, and a man cannot be permitted to owne his ignorance without their leave, one is forced to looke into their hypotheseis, either to admire the clearnesse and demonstration where with it carys all before it, or the Insolence where-with they would impose it, and expect every one should submissively receive it.


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Some men ... submissively receive it. F | om.W
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