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Adversaria, MS ‘Adversaria 1661’, p. 25

 
 

MS ‘Adversaria 1661‘

[1] Introduction. Large folio notebook, 321 leaves. The original is in a private collection. Transcriptions are based on prints from microfilm copies.

[2] Printed notices. See John Milton, ‘The dating of ”Adversaria 1661”’ The Locke Newsletter 29 (1998) 105-117.

Alternative dates: see Sargentich, ‘Locke and Ethical Theory’, p. 24: ‘Although the first manuscript piece, “Morality”, is undated, since it is highly hedonistic, it was probably written relatively late in Locke’s life.’ But ‘pleasure’ is a pervasive element in practically all of Locke’s ethical fragments, so its appearance does not contribute much towards dating the fragment. Goldie, in Locke, Political Essays, p. 267 suggests as dates c. 1677-1678 [WHY?].
The last part of this text, captioned under ‘Law’, is dated c. 1693 by Goldie, in Locke, Political Essays, p. 328 [WHY?].
On the same grounds Locke probably ordered Brownouver to copy sections 10 and 11 from Draft B rather than from Draft C, i.e. because these passages were not any longer contained by Draft C. [CHECK] Locke’s long quotation from Draft B in ‘Of Ethick’ does not mean that ‘a part of it must have been written as early as 1671’ (i.e. the date of composition of Draft B), see Nuovo, ‘Introduction’ to Locke, Writings on Religion
See von Leyden, introduction to Locke, Essays on the Law of Nature, pp. 69-70.
It is possible that Locke deliberately refrained from giving a number to 27 bis, since it seems to continue a sentence started in paragraph 27; a similar continuity, however, can be noticed between pars 33 and 34, and yet Locke did assign two separate numbers to these two textual units.
It is possible that Locke deliberately refrained from giving a number to 27 bis, since it seems to continue a sentence started in paragraph 27; a similar continuity, however, can be noticed between pars 33 and 34, and yet Locke did assign two separate numbers to these two textual units.
Cf. Heawood, Watermarks, Nr. 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols. 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.
The place that Locke prescribes here is indeed the place that it has been given both in C-1706 and in the present edition; this place results once his instructions in MS e.1 pp. 113-114 concerning the introductory paragraphs on pp. 114-116 of the same MS are carried out (see below, [54]).
In the present edition, this sentence is given in the collation of MS e.1 with MS c.28.
Corr. 2243, VI, p. 87.
Corr. 2262, VI, p. 123.
Corr. 2310, VI, p. 190.
Corr. 2340, VI, pp. 243-244: ‘J’avois resolu de faire quelques additions, dont j’ai déja composé quelques unes qui sont assez amples, et qui auroint pû <paroitre> en leur place dans la quatriéme Edition que le Libraire se dispose à faire, Et j’aurois voluntiers satisfait a votre desir ou au desir d’aucun de vos amys en y <inserant> les preuves de l’unité de Dieu qui se presentent à mon Esprit. Car je suis enclin à croire que l’Unité de Dieu peut etre aussi evidemment demonstre que son existance; et qu’elle peut etre établie sur de preuves qui ne laisseront aucun suject d’en douter. Mais j’aime la Paix, et il y a des gens dans le monde qui aiment si fort les criailleries et les vaines contestations, que je doute, si je dois leur fournir de nouveaux sujets de dispute.’
Corr. 2624, VI, p. 704: ‘On m’a dit que vous aviez encore composé un autre Ouvrage de Philosophie de la maniere de conduire son esprit dans la Recherche de la Verité. Si cela est, vous courez risque de’être un peu importuné de le publier, et de me voir dans le nombre de ces importuns. Il n’y a point de livres, dont le Public ait tant besoin que de ceux-là.’
Corr. 2649, VI, pp. 758-759.
Guenellon, born in France, was one of the principal doctors of the St. Pieters Gasthuis in Amsterdam from 1684 to 1720. He and Locke had become acquainted in Paris around 1678 and met regularly again during the latter’s exile in the Dutch Republic. Cf. Corr. 831, II, p. 738, n. 2.
Corr. 2785, VII, p. 156, n. 1.
Corr. 2743, VII, p. 105: ‘Monsieur le Clerc m’a dit que vous travaillez a un nouvel ouvrage, pour decouvrir les maladies de l’esprit, c’est une nouvelle obligation que le public vous aura, quel bien ne sera ce pas, si vous pouvez guerir les hommes de leur fausses idees, et les mettre par methode dans le chemin de la verité!’
Corr. 2835, VII, pp. 212-213: ‘mes amis qui ont lu vótre traitté de l’entendement me demandent souvent, sur ce qu’on leur a fait esperer, si vos reflexions sur les erreurs de lentendement verront bien tost le jour. il jugent par l’excellence de ce que vous avez publiez, que le public vous en sera fort obligé.’
Corr. 3429, VIII, pp. 171-172. De Beer assumes that the MS is MS Locke e.1. The Observator was a newspaper.
Corr. 3647, VIII, pp. 412-414.
Yolton, John Locke a Descriptive Bibliography, nr. 249, p. 299.
Cf. Essay, notes on p. 640 and p. 454 respectively.
Nidditch, ‘Introduction’ to Essay, p. xxix.
The first entry on fol. 69v and the entries on fol. 70r are in the hand of Locke, who can be seen here initiating his new servant in the art of book-keeping.
MS Locke c.24, fol. 285r, Corr. 3188, VII, pp. 676-677.
The identification of Shaw as the scribe of MS c.28 fols. 121-130 is mine; however, credit for the identification of Shaw as the scribe of MS e.1 pp. 210-216 as well, and the subsequent use of Locke’s ledgers to test (and confirm) both hypotheses goes to Prof. M.~A. Stewart. In addition, Prof. C. Dekker was so kind as to submit both hypotheses to careful paleographical scrutiny; he could confirm that both hands belong to the same person.
Cf. Greetham, Textual Scholarship, p. 172 and pp. 211-213.
Cf. Locke’s farewell letter to P. King, 4 and 25 October 1704, Corr. 3647, VIII, p. 416: ‘If my Paraphrase and notes on the Ephesians are not wholy transcribed before I dye (as I fear they will not. For however earnestly I have pressed it again and again I have not been able to prevaile with Will to dispatch the two first Chapters in three months) you must get it to be transcribed out of my filed papers after I am dead, that so it may be in a condition to be in a condition to be printed. Will after all I think be the fitest to transcribe them because he can read my hand and knows my way of writeing with the use of the references.’
Corr. (no number) VIII, p. 424.
MS Locke c.35, fol. 6v.
Corr. 3647, VIII, p. 417, n. 1.
MS f.10, p. 495.
MS c.1, p. 342.
MS f.10, p. 492.
Op. cit. no page number.
This fact confirms my assertion that MS c.28 did not function as printer’s copy for C-1706.
For what probably amounts to an internal reference to the Essay that was left unchanged, see par. 64: ‘this essay’.
That pp. 52-56 give a part of the Conduct seems to have escaped Long, A Summary Catalogue, although he remarks, p. 30: ‘The draft [containing both the Essay-part and the Conduct-part] is longer than the printed version [containing only the Essay-part].’
‘Introduction’ to C-1996, p. vii.
Cf. Heawood, Watermarks, Nr. 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols. 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.
Cf. Heawood, Watermarks, Nr. 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols. 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.
Cf. Heawood, Watermarks, Nr. 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols. 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.
Cf. Heawood, Watermarks, Nr. 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols. 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.
Cf. Heawood, Watermarks, Nr. 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols. 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.
Cf. Heawood, Watermarks, Nr. 3138.
For a similar use of pins by Locke, see his Journal for 1690, MS Locke f.10, pp. 24-25.
For a similar use of the word ‘Understanding’ for a quire that contains additions to the Essay, see MS Locke c.28, fols. 115-116.
The main instances of use of this different ink are listed in the annotation to the text.