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13. Association (1697)

Section 18 (of 18)

Normalized

Some such wrong and unnatural combinations of Ideas will be found , to establish the irreconcilable opposition between differing sects of philosophie and religion. for we cannot imagin every one of their followers to impose wilfully on him self and knowingly refuse truth offerd by plain reason. Interest though it does a great deale in the case yet cannot be thought to worke men to soe universal a perversnesse as knowingly to maintein falshood, some thing must blind their understandings and make them not see the truth which they pretend to pursue and noe doubt some of them sincerely doe. That which thus captivates their reasons, and leads men of sincerity blindfold from common sense will when examind be found to be what we are here speakeing of some independent Ideas of noe alliance to one an other are by education custom and the constant din of their party soe coupled in their mindes that they always appearthere togeather and they can noe more seperate them in their thoughts than if they were but one Idea soe that they take one for the other. This gives sense to Jargon, demonstration to absurditys and consistency to Nonsense, and is the foundation I had almost said of all the errors in the world. Or if it does not reach soe far it is at least the most dangerous one since soe far as it obteins it hinders men from seeing and examining. when twothings in them selves disjoynd appear to the sight constantly united. if the eye sees those things rivited which are loose when will you begin to rectifie the mistakes that follow from it. Tis a hard thing to convince any one that things are not soe, and naturaly soe as they constantly appear to him

Diplomatic

Some such wrong and unnatural combinations of Ideas as these will be found when examind to, to establish the irreconcilable di opposition between differing  sects of philosophie and religion. for we cannot imagin every one of their followers to impose wilfully on him self and knowingly refuse truth offerd by plain reason. Interest though it does a great deale in the case yet cannot be thought to worke soe uni men  to soe universal a perversnesse as knowingly to  maintein falshood, some thing must blind  their understandings and make  them not see the truth which they pretend to pursue and noe doubt some of them sincerely doe . That which thus captivates their reasons, and leads men of sincerity from blindfold from common sense will when examind be found to be what we are here  speakeing of some independent Ideas of noe alliance to one an other are by custom education custom and the constant din of their party soe coupled in their mindes that they always goe appearthere togeather and goe soe inseparably togeather they can noe more seperate them in their thoughts than if they were but one Idea soe that Idea soe that they take one for the other . This gives sense to Jargon, demonstration to absurditys and consistency to Nonsense, and is the foundation I  had almost said of all the errors in the world. Or if it does not reach soe far it is at least the most dangerous one since soe far as it obteins it hinders men from seeing and examining. when the eye sees twothings

52

constantly which are disjoynd in them selves disjoynd appear to the eye sight constantly united. if the eye sees those  things rivited which are loose when  will you begin the cure to rectifie the mistakes that follow from it. Tis a hard thing to convince any one that things are not soe, and naturaly soe as they constantly appear to him 


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The MS continues with three additional paragraphs that Locke included not in Essay, II.xxxiii, but in the ‘Conduct’, par. 77-79.

differing] 4: different

worke soe uni men] 4: worke whole Societies of men

knowingly to] 4: that every one of them to a Man should knowingly

some thing must blind] 4: Some at least must be allow'd to do what all pretend to, i.e. to pursue Truth sincerely; and therefore there must be something that blinds

make] 4: makes

truth which they pretend to pursue and noe doubt some of them sincerely doe] 4: falshood of what they embrace for real Truth.

soe that they take one for the other] 4: and they operate as if they were so.

foundation I] 4: foundation of the greatest, I
Possibly catchword, but not repeated on p. 52.

those] 4: these

when] 4: where

from it. Tis a hard thing to convince any one that things are not soe, and naturaly soe as they constantly appear to him] 4: in two Ideas, that they have been accustom’d so to join in their Minds, as to substitute one for the other, and, as I am apt to think, often without perceiving it themselves? This, whilst they are under the deceit of it. makes them uncapable of Conviction, and they applaud themselves as zealous Champions for truth, when indeed they are contending for Error; and the confusion of two diffent Ideas, which a customary connexion of them in their Minds hath to them made in effect but one, fills their Heads with false Views, and their Reasonings with false Consequences.
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