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11. Enthusiasm (1695-1697)

Section 2 (of 16)

Normalized

A constant concomitant of this bias and corruption of our judgments is the assumeing an authority of dictateing to others and a forwardnesse to prescribe to their opinions. For how almost can it be other wise but that he should be ready to impose on others beleif who has already imposed on his own and who can reasonably expect arguments and conviction from him whose understanding is not accustomed to them who does violence to his own faculties tyranizes over his owne minde, and usurpes the prerogative of truth a love which is to command assent only by its own authority. i e by and in proportion to theevidence which it carys with it.

Diplomatic

A constant concomitant of this bias

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and corruption of our judgments is a forwardnesse to impose our opinions on others and compelling a desire to compell them to our tenets the assumeing an authority of dictateing to others and a forwardnesse to prescribe to their opinions . For how almost can it be other wise but that he should be ready to impose on others beleif understandingswho has done soe already imposed on his own and forced on his own minde done violence to his owne minde by usurping the prerogative of truth, which is, to be received only for and in proportion to its owne evidenceand 

7

violence may who can reasonably expect arguments and conviction from him whose understanding is not accustomed to them  who uses violence ... does violence to his own minde faculties tyranizes of over his owne minde, and usurpes the prerogative of truth a love  which is to gaine assent command assent only by its own authority. i e by and in proportion to the evidence which it carys with it.


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A constant concomitant of this bias

6

and corruption of our judgments is a forwardnesse to impose our opinions on others and compelling a desire to compell them to our tenets the assumeing an authority of dictateing to others and a forwardnesse to prescribe to their opinions] 4: The assuming an Authority of Dictating to others, and a forwardness to prescribe to their Opinions, is a constant concomitant of this bias and corruption of our Judgments.
beleif (Deleted.) understandings (Add. p. 7.) beleif (Undeleted.)

and] 4: om.
Add. comprising three paragraphs, starting on p. 7 and continuing on p. 9. Possibly the entire addition, but certainly the last two paragraphs, were entered after the addition to Essay 4.3.6 that can be found on p. 6. and p. 8.

whose understanding is not accustomed to them] 4: in dealing with others, whose understanding is not accustomed to them in his dealing with himself?

of truth a love] 4: that belongs to truth alone

the] 4: that
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