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1. Of the Conduct of the Understanding (1697-1704)

Section 99 (of 99)

Normalized

It will possibly be objected. Who is sufficient for all this? I answer more than can be imagined. Every one knows what his proper business is and what according to the Character he makes of him self the world may justly expect of him, and to answer that he will find he will have time and opertunity enough to furnish him self if he will not deprive him self by a narrowness of Spirit, of those helps that are at hand. I doe not say to be a good Geographer that a man should visit every mountain river promontory and creeke upon the face of the Earth view the buildings and survey the land every where as if he were goeing to make a purchase. But yet every one must allow that he shall know a country better that makes often salleys into it and traverses it up and down, than he that like a mill horse goes still round in the same tract or keeps within the narrow bounds of a feild or two that delight him. He that will enquire out the best books in every science and informe himself of the most material authers of the several sects in philosophie and religion will not find it an infinite worke to acquaint himself with the sentiments of mankind concerning the most weighty and comprehensive subjects, Let him exercise the freedom of his reason and understanding in such a latitude as this and his mind will be strengthened, his capacity inlarged his facultys improved. And the light which the remote and scatterd parts of truth will give to one another will so assist his judgment that he will seldom be widely out or miss giveing proof of a clear head and a comprehensive knowledg. At least this is the onely way I know to give the understanding its due inprovement to the full extent of its capacity, and to distinguish the two most different things I know in the world a logical chicanner from a man of reason. Onely he that would thus give the mind its flight, and send abroad his enquirys into all parts after truth must be sure to setle in his head determined Ideas of all that he imploys his thoughts about, and never fail to judg himself and judg unbiassedly of all that he receives from others either in their writeings or discourses. Reverence or prejudice must not be sufferd to give beauty or deformity to any of their opinions.

The following parts of MS Locke e.1 clearly pertain to the ‘Conduct’ although they do not strictly belong to the text itself. Deleted entries are given between [ ].

<C>

Page i starts with the last entries of a list to the contents of MS Locke e.1, every entry on a new line. The preceding leaf is now lost (see Manuscripts MS Locke e.1 [5]). All entries, except the last, are followed by numbers. These numbers correspond with the pages of MS Locke e.1. The colour of the ink of individual entries corresponds with the ink of the texts to which they refer.

Analogie 203

Fallacies 222

Fundamental questions 222

Bottoming 228

Transplanting 230

Reasoning right in narrow and in large views 248

Custome

<D>

Instructions concerning the ‘Conduct’, entered at the middle of p. i. Written in the same ink.

Mem: That these following discourses are to be writ out under their several heads into distinct Chapters, and then to be numberd and ranged according to their natural order.

<E>

E-I were all entered on p. 1 of MS Locke e.1 (see ill. 1). They are given here as separate items because they may have been entered at different times and because their mutual connexion is tenuous. The one word forming E may have been intended as header.

Misconduct

<F>

A partially deleted list with subjects that Locke was going to address in the ‘Conduct’.

[Jadeing the minde by things too difficult, or deposeing it by a confinement to things too easy, or stoping at the first difficulty or lazily siting still]

Hunting after similes

[Makeing too much haste to the conclusion and not goeing by gradual steps]

[Learning of arguments]

[Allowing too much to first impressions]

[some take all some reject all popular opinions]

[some wholy assert novelty others antiquitie]

<G>

G-I also contain subjects that Locke was going to address in the Conduct.

Thinking of things transciently and in gros we fright our selves with supposed difficulties which vanish where we come to examine things by their distinct parts

<H>

To read books for arguments: The right way to knowledge and improvement is to setle determind Ideas in our minds and then to observe and finde out their relations and habitudes in the knowledg of self evident propositions. all men that are rational creatures are equall, the difference of men in their parts is a sagacity to finde out the intermediate Ideas that shew the agreement or disagreement of others. and the difference of men in knowledg is the actualy haveing discoverd the agreement or disagreement of more Ideas.

<I>

The mind often frights it self with things seen in grosse in confusion and at a distance and soe forbears application which comeing to be viewd nearer and by parts would be as easy as other things that are masterd

<K>

Page 81, the first page of a new quire, contains a deleted list of subjects addressed in the 'Conduct'.

[Variety of Ideas and those abstract espetialy

Freedom of minde for truth

Examin our own principles: which we demand of others

Observations too soon or too seldom made

Stoping at difficulties

Concludeing to<o> soon

Running to similies

To sit still lazy is noe conduct at al]

Diplomatic

It will possibly be objected. Who is sufficient for all this? I answer more than can be imagined. Every one knows what his proper business is and what according to the Character he makes of him self the world may justly expect of him, and to answer that he will find he will have time and opertunity enough to furnish him self if he will not deprive him self by a narrowness of Spirit, of those helps that are at hand. I doe not say to be a good Geographer that a man should visit every mountain river promontory and creeke upon the face of the Earth and view the buildings and survey the land every where as if he were goeing to make a purchase. But yet every one must allow that he shall know a country better that makes often salleys into it and traverses it up and down, than he that like a mill horse goes still round in the same tract and or keeps within the narrow bounds of a feild or two that delight him. He that will enquire out the best books in every science and informe himself of the most material authers of the several sects in philosophie and religion will not find it an infinite worke to acquaint himself with the sentiments of mankind concerning the most weighty and comprehensive subjects, Let him exercise the freedom of his reason and understanding in such a latitude as this and his mind inlarged hiswill be strengthened, his capacity inlarged his facultys improved. And the light which the remote and scatterd parts of truth will give to one another will so assist his judgment that he will seldom be widely out or miss being thought a knowing man. Only hegiveing proof of a clear head and a comprehensive knowledg. At least this is the onely way  I know to give the understanding its due inprovement to the full extent of its capacity, and to distinguish the two most different things I know in the world a logical chicanner from a man of reason. Onely he that would thus give the mind its flight, and send abroad his enquirys into all parts after truth must be sure to setle in his mind head determined Ideas of all that he imploys his thoughts about, and never fail to judg himself of all that he and judg unbiassedly of all that he receives from others either in their writeings or discourses. Reverence or prejudice must not be sufferd to give beauty or deformity to any of their opinions.

The following parts of MS Locke e.1 clearly pertain to the ‘Conduct’ although they do not strictly belong to the text itself. Deleted entries are given between [ ].

<C>

Page i starts with the last entries of a list to the contents of MS Locke e.1, every entry on a new line. The preceding leaf is now lost (see Manuscripts MS Locke e.1 [5]). All entries, except the last, are followed by numbers. These numbers correspond with the pages of MS Locke e.1. The colour of the ink of individual entries corresponds with the ink of the texts to which they refer.

Analogie 203

Fallacies 222

Fundamental questions 222

Bottoming 1228

Transplanting 230

Reasoning right in narrow and in large views 248

Custome

<D>

Instructions concerning the ‘Conduct’, entered at the middle of p. i. Written in the same ink.

Mem: That these following discourses are to be writ out under their several heads into distinct Chapters, and then to be numberd and ranged according to their natural order.

<E>

E-I were all entered on p. 1 of MS Locke e.1 (see ill. 1). They are given here as separate items because they may have been entered at different times and because their mutual connexion is tenuous. The one word forming E may have been intended as header.

Misconduct

<F>

A partially deleted list with subjects that Locke was going to address in the ‘Conduct’.

[Jadeing the minde by things too difficult, or deposeing it by a confinement to things too easy, or stoping at the first difficulty or lazily siting still]

Hunting after similes

[Makeing too much haste to the conclusion and not goeing by gradual steps]

[Learning of arguments]

[Allowing too much to first impressions]

[some take all some reject all popular opinions]

[some wholy assert novelty others antiquitie]

<G>

G-I also contain subjects that Locke was going to address in the Conduct.

Thinking of things transciently and in gros we fright our selves with supposed difficulties which vanish where we come to examine things by their distinct parts

<H>

To read books for arguments: The right way to knowledge and improvement is to setle determind Ideas in our minds and then to observe and finde out their relations and habitudes in the knowledg of self evident propositions. all men that are rational creatures are equall, the difference of men in their parts is a sagacity to finde out the intermediate Ideas that shew the agreement or disagreement of others. and the difference of men in knowledg is the actualy haveing discoverd the agreement or disagreement of more Ideas.

<I>

The mind often frights it self with things seen in grosse in confusion and at a distance and soe forbears application which comeing to be viewd nearer and by parts would be as easy as other things that are masterd

<K>

Page 81, the first page of a new quire, contains a deleted list of subjects addressed in the 'Conduct'.

[Variety of Ideas and those abstract espetialy

Freedom of minde for truth

Examin our own principles: which we demand of others

Observations too soon or too seldom made

Stoping at difficulties

Concludeing to<o> soon

Running to similies

To sit still lazy is noe conduct at al]


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See par. 62.
See par. 66.
See par. 43 and 59.
See par. 42.
See par. 60.
See par. 50.
See par. 49.
See par. 74.
See par. 42 and 98.
See par. 74.
See par. 30 and 65.
See par. 36, 37, 44, 49, 68, 77 and 99.
See par. 11, 13, 15, 31, 35, 36, 45 and 47.
See par. 39, 59, 60 and 61.
See par. 62.
See par. 43, 58 and 59.
See par. 66.
See par. 43, 44, 45 and 62.

way] B: may
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