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12. Ballance the difficulties (1697)

Section 1 (of 3)

Normalized

Ballance the difficulties on both sides

And therefor it is not of such mighty necessity to be determined one way or ’tother as some over zealous for or against the immateriality of the soule have been apt to imagin who, whetheron the one side indulgeing too much to their thoughts immersed altogeather in matter can allow noe existence to what is not material or who on the other side findeing not cogitation within the naturall powers of matter examind over and over again by the severest intention of minde have the confidence to conclude that omnipotency it self cannot givelife and perception to a substance which has the modification of solidity. He that considers how hardly in our thoughts sensation is reconcilable to extended matter or existence to any thing that has noe extension at all will confesse that he is very far from certainly knowing what his soule is. Tis a point that seems to me put out of our reach and he who will give him self leave to consider freely and weigh the seeming inconsistency in either hypothesis will scarce finde his reason able to determine him fixedly for or against its materiality since on which side soe ever he views it either as an unextended being or as a thinking extended matter thedifficulty to conceive either will whilst either alone is in his thoughts stilldrive him to the contrary side. An unfair way which some men take with themselves who because of the un con ceiveablenesse of something they finde in one throw them selves violently into the contrary hypothesis though altogeather as unintelligible to an unbiassed understanding. This serves not only to shew the weaknesse of our faculties and the scantynesse of our knowledg but the insignificant triumph of such sort of arguments which drawn from our own views may satisfy us that we can finde noe certainty on this or that one side of the question but doe not at al<l> thereby help us to truth by running us into the opposite opinion which on examination will be found clogd with equall difficultys for what safety what advantage to any one is it for the avoiding the seeming absurditys or to him unsurmounta ble rubs he meets with in one opinion to run into the contrary which is built on something altogeather as inexplicable and as far remote from his comprehension?

Diplomatic

6

Ballance the difficulties on both sides

And therefor it is not of that such mighty moment that necessity to be determined  one way or ’tother as some over zealous for or against the immateriality of the soule have been apt to imagin  who, whether on the one same side same indulgeing too much to their thoughts accustomed to extension and matter they engagd wholy in material things who immersed altogeather in matter can allow noe existence to what has noe extension is not material ........... or who on the other side examining the powers of matter cannot finde in it other minds findeing not roome for thought cogitation in within the naturall powers of matter examind over and over again by the severest  intention of minde have the confidence to conclude that matter not capable of omnipotency it self cannot givelife and perception  to a substance which has the modification of solidity. He that considers how hardly ... in our thoughts sensation is  reconcilable to extended matter or existence to any thing that has noe extension at all will confesse that he is not very capable of conceiveing what ... his soulis very far from certainly knowing what his soule is. soe far that Tis a point that  seems to me put  out of our reach .. and

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that he who who will be scarce able by probabilitie reason give him self leave to consider freely and distinguish between his own knowledg and ignorance will see and weigh the difficulties on both sides will scarce be able by the light of reason and weigh the seeming inconsistency in either  hypothesis will scarce finde his reason able to determine him self fixedly to either side for or against its  materiality since on which side soe ever he views it either as an unextended being  or as a thinking extended matter probability w. thedifficulty with it to conceive either in apprehending it will whilst either alone is in his thoughts stilldrive him to the contrary side contrary side. An unfair way which some men take with themselves who because of the un con ceiveablenesse of something they finde in one throw them selves violently into the contrary hypothesis though altogeather as unintelligible to an unbiassed understanding. This serves not only to shew the weaknesse of our know faculties  and the narrownesse scantynesse of our knowledg but the insignificant triumph of such sort of arguments which drawn from the weaknesse of narrownesse our capacitys doe unlesse where doe not at all help us to truth tell unlesse own views may satisfy us that there is we can finde noe certainty on this or that  one side of the question but doe not at al<l> thereby help us to truth unlessewhere by makeing us imbrace by running us into  the opposite opinion be grounded is which on examination will be found clogd with equall difficultys and is light on something equally as far remote from our comprehensions for what safety what advantage to any one is it for the avoiding the seeming absurditys or  by to him unsurmounta ble difficulty of ble rubs he meets with in one opinion to run place himself into  the opposite contrary which is built on something altogeather as inexplicable and as far remote from his comprehension?


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The place of this draft in the Essay was marked by Locke in MS e.1 with a reference to the third edition (‘p. 311. l 7 —— in this life.’).

be determined] 4: determine

apt to imagin] 4: forward to make the world believe

whether] 4: either

severest] 4: utmost

life and perception] 4: Perception and Thought

in our thoughts sensation is] 4: sensation is, in our thoughts

that] 4: which

to me put] 4: to me, to be put

our reach] 4: the reach of our knowledge

weigh the seeming inconsistency in either] 4: look into the dark and intricate part of each

its] 4: the soul's

being] 4: substance

of our know faculties] 4: om.

this or that] 4: om.

us into] 4: into

or] 4: and
Deleted, then undeleted by subdotting.
Deleted, then undeleted by subdotting.

run place himself into] 4: take refuge in
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