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30. ‘We cannot but thinke that angels’ (c. 1694-1695)

Section 1 (of 2)

Normalized

We cannot but thinke that angels of all kindes much exceed us in knowledg and possibly we are apt sometimes to envy them that advantage or at least to repine that we doe not partake with them in a greater share of it. who ever thinkes of the elevation of their knowledg above ours cannot imagin it lyes in a playing with words but in the contemplation of things and haveing true notions about them and a perception of their habitudes and relations one to another. If this be soe methinks we should be ambitious to come, in this part which is a great deale | in our power as near them as we can: We should cast off all that artifice and | fallacie of words which makes soe great a part of the businesse and skill of the disputers of this world and is contemptible even to rationall men. and therefor must render us ridiculous to those higher orders of spirits whilst we pretending to the knowledg of things hinder as much as we can the discovery of truth by perplexing one an other all we can by a perverse use of those signes which we make use of to convey it to one an other. Must it not be matter of contempt to them to see us and make the studied and improvd abuse of those signes have the name and credit of learning? should not we our selves thinke the Chinese very ridiculous if they should set those destined to knowledge out of the way to it rewarding their proficiency in that which leads them quite from it.

Diplomatic

118r

We cannot but thinke that angels of all kindes much exceed us in knowledg and possibly we are apt sometimes to envy them for it that advantage or at least to ..d. repine that we doe not share partake with them in it a greater share of it. who ever thinkes of the elevation of their knowledg above ours cannot imagin it lyes in a playing with words but in the contemplation of things and haveing true notions about them and a right way of compareing a perception of their habitudes and relations one to another. If this be soe methinks we should endeavour be ambitious to come, in this part which we..... as is a great deale | in our power as near them as we can: A We should cast off all that artifice of fallicy of words which we cannot but conclude is contemptible to them and make the best use we could of such signes which we are fain to make use of only to supply what and | pudder about fallacie of words which makes soe great a part of the businesse and skill of the disputers of this world and is contemptible even to rationall men. and therefor must render us ridiculous to those higher orders of spirits whilst we pretending to the knowledg of things hinder as much as we can the discovery of truth by perplexing one an other all we can by a perverse use of those signes which we make use of to convey it to one an other. .. Must it not be matter of contempt to them to see us and not make the studied and improvd abuse of those signes have the name and credit of learning? and encourag..and we should not pret m... we should not we our selves thinke the Chinese very ridiculous if they should set those destined to knowledge out of the way to it by proposeing rewards to that which leads them quite from it......them in it rewarding their proficiency in that which leads them quite from it.


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This draft was marked by Locke in MS Locke c.28 with ‘B. III C. X §13 ——— to doe so’ on fol. 118r, indicating the projected point of insertion in the Essay.
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