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3. Some other loose thoughts [=Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris’s Books], 1693

Section 1 (of 34)

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Some other loose thoughts which I set down as they came in my way in a hasty perusal of some of Mr Norris’s writeings, to be better digested when I shall have leisure to make an End of this Argument.

1 1 v. Remarks. p. 48There are some who think they have given an account of the nature of Ideas by telling us we see them in God as if we understood what Ideas in the understanding of God are, better than when they are in our own understandings; or their nature were better known when t’is said that the immediate object of our understandings are the divine Ideas, the omniforme essence of Godpartiallyrepresented or exhibited. v. Reflections 31So that this now has made the matter clear, there can be no difficulty left when we are told that our Ideas are the Divine Ideas and theDivine Ideas the omniforme Essence of God: for what the Devine Ideas are, we know as plainly, as we know, what 1. 2. & 3 is; and it is a satisfactory Explication of what our Ideas are, to tell us they are no other than the Divine Ideas and the Divine essence is more familiar and level to our knowledg than any thing we can thinke of; Besides there can be no difficulty in understanding how the Divine Ideas are Gods essence.

Diplomatic

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Some other loose thoughts which I set down as they came in my way in a hasty perusal of some of Mr Norris’s writeings, to be better digested when I shall have leisure to make an End of this Argument. 

v. Remarks. p. 48There are some who think they have given an account of the nature of Ideas by telling us we see them in God as if we understood what Ideas in the understanding of God are, better than when they are in our own understandings; or their nature were better known when t’is said that the immediate object of our understandings are the divine Ideas, the omniforme essence of Godpartially represented or exhibited. v. Reflections 31So that this now has made the matter clear, there can be no difficulty left when we are told that our Ideas are the Divine Ideas and theDivine Ideas the omniforme Essence of God: for what the Devine Ideas are, we know as plainly, as we know, what 1. 2. & 3 is; and it is a satisfactory Exply Explication of what our Ideas are, to tell us they are no other than the Divine Ideas and the Divine essence is more familiar and level to our knowledg than any th

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ing we can  thinke of; Besides there can be no difficulty in understanding how the Divine Ideas are Gods essence.


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In ‘A Brief Consideration of the Remarques made upon the foregoing Reflections by the Gentlemen of the Athenian Society’, appended to his Christian Blessedness (London, 1692, second edition), p. 48, Norris repeats his complaint that Locke did not state the nature of ideas (see the first sentence of section 2 of the present text), but on this page, contrary to what Locke’s reference may suggest, Norris does not give his own views, i.e. the Malebranchean ‘vision in God’.
Norris, Cursory Reflections, p. 31: ‘What else need, and what else can be the immediate Object of our Understanding but the Divine Ideas, the Omniform Essence of God? (…) Here I can tell what an Idea is, viz. the Omniform Essence of God partially represented, and how it comes to be united to my Mind.’

Some other loose thoughts which I set down as they came in my way in a hasty perusal of some of Mr Norris’s writeings, to be better digested when I shall have leisure to make an End of this Argument.] P: Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris's books, wherein he asserts F. Malebranche's Opinion of our seeing all things in God.

partially] E: partially

can] P: om.
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